DiNG

photographer, cameraman and video editor. Specialising in extreme sports, sports portraiture and studio work. Also a water based screen printer working for Supersaturated.
I’ve been perfecting the official SKA tour t-shirt today. Had to remake screens to get the right grey tone, as the first effort was slightly too dark. Very happy with the end results. 

This is going to be the official tour t-shirt for the student kitesurfing association tour 2013/14. Supported  by supersaturated.

I’ve been perfecting the official SKA tour t-shirt today. Had to remake screens to get the right grey tone, as the first effort was slightly too dark. Very happy with the end results.

This is going to be the official tour t-shirt for the student kitesurfing association tour 2013/14. Supported by supersaturated.

22nd Sep 2013 | 1 note
Logo surf chick t-shirt. Available soon. #supersaturated #hardwearing #hard #living #livestyle #beachlife #surfing #surf #hot #secy #bikini #girl #bum #screenprinting #halftone #southwest

Logo surf chick t-shirt. Available soon. #supersaturated #hardwearing #hard #living #livestyle #beachlife #surfing #surf #hot #secy #bikini #girl #bum #screenprinting #halftone #southwest

18th Aug 2013
4 colour process print using water-based inks. At 55 dpi.

4 colour process print using water-based inks. At 55 dpi.

30th Apr 2013
How to screen print #1
just because it looks easy doesn’t mean it is.
make a mess
clean it up
look after your screens and prepare them carefully
practise makes permanent/not perfect
be original
It’s 2 years since i picked up a squeegee and pushed some ink accross a screen to make my first t-shirt. I probably learnt the hard way as i’ve never really read had any lessons, i’ve just played around, asked a few questions then experiemented. I’m now at the stage when i can print, within reason, anything I want, and starting to get some recognition in the screenprinting community. It gives me great pleasure in bringing not only my own photos to life, but those of close friends. This particular design is a collaboration between Tim Borrow's photo, and my design and printing. I've also gone to the added lengths of making a negative screen so that i can invert the colourway.Supersaturated is about to push out of it’s sandbox years. Those where we were trying different ideas and experiementing with the brand. Into a new era. One where we’ve finally ‘defined ourselves’ as a hardwearing fashion brand for a water obsessed community. we’re constantly moving forward so we came up with this idea. using a full front image which is very fashionable at the moment.NEVER LOOK BACK…. available soon.

How to screen print #1

  1. just because it looks easy doesn’t mean it is.
  2. make a mess
  3. clean it up
  4. look after your screens and prepare them carefully
  5. practise makes permanent/not perfect
  6. be original

It’s 2 years since i picked up a squeegee and pushed some ink accross a screen to make my first t-shirt. I probably learnt the hard way as i’ve never really read had any lessons, i’ve just played around, asked a few questions then experiemented. I’m now at the stage when i can print, within reason, anything I want, and starting to get some recognition in the screenprinting community.

It gives me great pleasure in bringing not only my own photos to life, but those of close friends. This particular design is a collaboration between Tim Borrow's photo, and my design and printing. I've also gone to the added lengths of making a negative screen so that i can invert the colourway.

Supersaturated is about to push out of it’s sandbox years. Those where we were trying different ideas and experiementing with the brand. Into a new era. One where we’ve finally ‘defined ourselves’ as a hardwearing fashion brand for a water obsessed community. we’re constantly moving forward so we came up with this idea. using a full front image which is very fashionable at the moment.

NEVER LOOK BACK….
available soon.


12th Feb 2013 | 2 notes
Smug, happy me.It’s taken a long time to learn how to do it, but finally this week i managed to screen print one of my photos of the barelling levy onto a t-shirt.
I did this by using a colour processing technique similar to your deskjet printer, CMYK colour simulation.
The technique is long, and painful. It involves seperating the colours of a photo into Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key (Black). Making each of these portions of the photo halftone at different angles, and finally making them into seperate screens for the screen printing process.It’s especially nice feeling to know that the photo was taken on a typical moody UK winter day, where Leven was pumping and some riders I knew where hitting it and tucking in. This was also my first day of real surf photography in the UK.I have a few tweaks to do before I put the T-shirt into the Supersaturated studios for some mass production, but the test shirt came out pimp.Next stop colour process printing on black… now that would be impressive.

Smug, happy me.

It’s taken a long time to learn how to do it, but finally this week i managed to screen print one of my photos of the barelling levy onto a t-shirt.

I did this by using a colour processing technique similar to your deskjet printer, CMYK colour simulation.


The technique is long, and painful. It involves seperating the colours of a photo into Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key (Black). Making each of these portions of the photo halftone at different angles, and finally making them into seperate screens for the screen printing process.

It’s especially nice feeling to know that the photo was taken on a typical moody UK winter day, where Leven was pumping and some riders I knew where hitting it and tucking in. This was also my first day of real surf photography in the UK.

I have a few tweaks to do before I put the T-shirt into the Supersaturated studios for some mass production, but the test shirt came out pimp.

Next stop colour process printing on black… now that would be impressive.

28th Jan 2013 | 1 note
"The Watcher"
Another one from my Cornish mission the other day.
I have less time to stretch my photography now that I run my own screen printing studios but I try and get at least one shoot in each week. I am fortunate enough to schedule my own working hours, and taking a tuesday off for a good swell forecast was a no brainer.Like my last photo, I’m happy to admit that this is an ‘artistic impression’ of what I wanted to see.
The camera saw a whole heap more than I wanted to show. fortunately photoshop comes with a few handy tools to help erase these diluting details away from your viewers eyes.If you haven’t already come across the patch tool or the clone tool, then you should.
Patch is perfect for sorting out spots on faces, dust spots showing from your sensor at high aperture shots, or in this case, unwanted surfers hanging out back!
Clone is epic for erasing larger areas with more precision, although you do have to be careful where you take the clone from. The eye has an amazingly uncanny way of seeing repeat patterns in cloned pictures. So use with a very low opacity and randomise where you copy from so that it gives a natural feel.Saying this, I couldn’t quite eradicate one of the people from the peer without leaving tell-tale signs. you should be able to spot it if you look hard enough.
If you wonder what i’ll end up doing with my photos visit here to see what I did with my Mauritus shot: Supersaturated signature series

"The Watcher"

Another one from my Cornish mission the other day.

I have less time to stretch my photography now that I run my own screen printing studios but I try and get at least one shoot in each week. I am fortunate enough to schedule my own working hours, and taking a tuesday off for a good swell forecast was a no brainer.

Like my last photo, I’m happy to admit that this is an ‘artistic impression’ of what I wanted to see.

The camera saw a whole heap more than I wanted to show. fortunately photoshop comes with a few handy tools to help erase these diluting details away from your viewers eyes.

If you haven’t already come across the patch tool or the clone tool, then you should.

Patch is perfect for sorting out spots on faces, dust spots showing from your sensor at high aperture shots, or in this case, unwanted surfers hanging out back!

Clone is epic for erasing larger areas with more precision, although you do have to be careful where you take the clone from. The eye has an amazingly uncanny way of seeing repeat patterns in cloned pictures. So use with a very low opacity and randomise where you copy from so that it gives a natural feel.

Saying this, I couldn’t quite eradicate one of the people from the peer without leaving tell-tale signs. you should be able to spot it if you look hard enough.


If you wonder what i’ll end up doing with my photos visit here to see what I did with my Mauritus shot: Supersaturated signature series


Here’s the before and after shots from one of my photos from my recent trip to Cornwall. As a photographer I’m not fastidious about ‘getting everything in camera’, and I don’t mind a bit of photoshopping for the sake of art. I’m keen to practise most aspects of photography to score something that looks good. No-one is going to stop technology, and consequently, I like to keep my eye in with different post production techniques, even if it’s more for practise than getting jaw dropping results.To be honest I was happy with the original shot. Jamie O, one of Supersaturated's riders from the Plymouth university surf team, getting stuck into one of his “best rides of his life!” (Quote form Jamie himself)As normal in a UK photoshoot, the clouds look obviously flat and vibrancy of the photo is a typical 50 shades of grey! therefore It can’t harm to give it a make over, right?
I knew what I wanted whilst out on the water as i’d already taken some well exposed photos of the moody looking clouds, with a vision of doing sky replacement on some of my shots. Adding to the sense that this surf session was a event of nature. Storms brewing and all that. The following steps form the Photoshop treatment that i took:Add new sky. Mask with a gradient. Position over old sky. Tidy mask around wave with soft brush. Lower opacity. Alter with curves and contrast. Lower saturation of whole image. Add layer for sunbeams by isolating highlights and using radial blur. Masking unwanted sunbeams. Converting to softlight. Add guassian blur to sunbeams. Add seagul.Photo taken from wetsuit with a Nikon D7000 with 50mm 1.8mm (in a surf waterhousing which i don’t name as it’s a shite company).

Here’s the before and after shots from one of my photos from my recent trip to Cornwall.

As a photographer I’m not fastidious about ‘getting everything in camera’, and I don’t mind a bit of photoshopping for the sake of art. I’m keen to practise most aspects of photography to score something that looks good. No-one is going to stop technology, and consequently, I like to keep my eye in with different post production techniques, even if it’s more for practise than getting jaw dropping results.

To be honest I was happy with the original shot. Jamie O, one of Supersaturated's riders from the Plymouth university surf team, getting stuck into one of his “best rides of his life!” (Quote form Jamie himself)

As normal in a UK photoshoot, the clouds look obviously flat and vibrancy of the photo is a typical 50 shades of grey! therefore It can’t harm to give it a make over, right?

I knew what I wanted whilst out on the water as i’d already taken some well exposed photos of the moody looking clouds, with a vision of doing sky replacement on some of my shots. Adding to the sense that this surf session was a event of nature. Storms brewing and all that.

The following steps form the Photoshop treatment that i took:

Add new sky. Mask with a gradient. Position over old sky. Tidy mask around wave with soft brush. Lower opacity. Alter with curves and contrast. Lower saturation of whole image. Add layer for sunbeams by isolating highlights and using radial blur. Masking unwanted sunbeams. Converting to softlight. Add guassian blur to sunbeams. Add seagul.

Photo taken from wetsuit with a Nikon D7000 with 50mm 1.8mm (in a surf waterhousing which i don’t name as it’s a shite company).

Gimmicky as it maybe, there’s much fun to be had with long exposure and wire wool.I had a trial run a few days before this shot to hone the settings. The dark hours definitely out weigh the daylight ones so it’s always nice to experiment around with a tripod and fire.The essence of it is that you get some wire wool from a DIY store, fluff it up a little, Stuff it into an eggwhisk, light it and take shot.Shot exposure is between 15 and 30 seconds for maximum effect, in this shot i’ve jammed the apperture as closed as i can (f22) so that the lights in the background have that star effect. Don’t even think about doing these shots without a tripod.Finally to get the portrait aspect of this shot I had to use a high powered flash to compensate for the high aperture. Set in front of the subject in a diffuser box and flashed once during the 30 secs exposure by manual trigger.Post, i had to clean up some double exposure over the shirt where the spinning whisk looked like it was coming through, other than that it’s all done in camera with one shot.Gimmicky, but fun.See a few more from this shoot here

Gimmicky as it maybe, there’s much fun to be had with long exposure and wire wool.

I had a trial run a few days before this shot to hone the settings. The dark hours definitely out weigh the daylight ones so it’s always nice to experiment around with a tripod and fire.

The essence of it is that you get some wire wool from a DIY store, fluff it up a little, Stuff it into an eggwhisk, light it and take shot.

Shot exposure is between 15 and 30 seconds for maximum effect, in this shot i’ve jammed the apperture as closed as i can (f22) so that the lights in the background have that star effect. Don’t even think about doing these shots without a tripod.

Finally to get the portrait aspect of this shot I had to use a high powered flash to compensate for the high aperture. Set in front of the subject in a diffuser box and flashed once during the 30 secs exposure by manual trigger.

Post, i had to clean up some double exposure over the shirt where the spinning whisk looked like it was coming through, other than that it’s all done in camera with one shot.

Gimmicky, but fun.

See a few more from this shoot here

Had a nice little shoot yesterday with some Parkour athletes.
This is probably my pick of the pack although plenty more to see here
Based from a lighting set up mastered by Joey. L (rad as hell photographer, google him!). but basically rooted in the dutch renaissance painter’s use of lighting. Which is to light the face from the other side of where you’re shooting so as to make the shadows do the work.This was taken in the middile of the day with a Bowen Flash light set up.

Had a nice little shoot yesterday with some Parkour athletes.

This is probably my pick of the pack although plenty more to see here

Based from a lighting set up mastered by Joey. L (rad as hell photographer, google him!). but basically rooted in the dutch renaissance painter’s use of lighting. Which is to light the face from the other side of where you’re shooting so as to make the shadows do the work.

This was taken in the middile of the day with a Bowen Flash light set up.